Michelle's story

Michelle and David started trying for a baby in 2005. After a year they were diagnosed with unexplained infertility and underwent numerous tests and treatments for the next two years.

During this time, they received Clomid, four artificial insemination treatments, one IVF cycle and suffered two miscarriages. Sadly they still do not have a positive outcome. Michelle tells their story.

 

Treatment time

"After a year of trying for a baby, we went for tests and were diagnosed with unexplained infertility. We asked for and received a 21-day blood test (for progesterone, which shows whether ovulation has occurred) and NHS-funded Clomid treatment for six months, but this was unsuccessful.

"Although we were on the waiting list for further funded treatment, we decided to have private AIH (Artificial insemination using the husband’s sperm), which cost us £600-£700. I had to do one injection every second day (about four or five injections in total) and there were several trips to the hospital for scans. The injections were really easy to get used to and with the auto injector it doesn’t really look like you’re injecting yourself. Even my husband, who hates needles admitted that it didn’t look too scary.

"The AIH resulted in a short-lived (six-week) non-viable pregnancy. We then underwent a further three unsuccessful cycles of NHS-funded AIH.

"After that, we went on the waiting list for one funded cycle of IVF and were lucky enough to start almost immediately. However, this too was unsuccessful. We were reviewing our options when I discovered I’d become pregnant naturally. We were over the moon but at six weeks, I again miscarried.

"So after four AIH treatments, one IVF cycle and two miscarriages we’re now wondering where we go from here. It all seems incredibly unfair and life is very cruel.

"We have now decided to have a break for six months. We were going to go straight into paying for another go at IVF, but we need a break from it all and there may be a chance that I can fall pregnant naturally again."

 

Feelings

"It’s just a long waiting game. You always seem to be waiting: waiting for appointments, waiting for results, waiting to hear what you can do next. I get very frustrated when nothing is happening and I’m not taking any drugs or trying to help things along. The emotions are such a rollercoaster – one minute low, the next as high as a kite and then we’d hit rock bottom.

"We have had loving support from both sets of parents and close family. We wanted to tell our parents as our families are very close and it is good to talk. Both of us have also had a good friend each who have gone through IVF and had failure and success. It really helped that we could have a good chat to someone else who knew exactly what we were going through."

 

Our relationship

"The problems of infertility and dealing with it are extremely hard. We feel that it is important you talk to your partner and make sure you are in this together. It is important that you make decisions together and you are both happy to move onto each stage. Our relationship is stronger as we’ve come through these difficult times and shared the emotional rollercoaster ride."

 

Our tips

  • "You need to do some research before going along to your appointments - I checked out what tests can be done and knew everything beforehand. At the appointment I could really say what I wanted. I also checked we’d had all infertility tests and that nothing more could be done there."
  • "To find all this out I asked for professional advice on the Infertility Network UK website and read the factsheets. They provided me with everything I needed to know."

Read Michelle's full story:

 

Page last updated: 28 August 2009

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