For donors

A group of donors at an IVF clinic

To donate can be a life-changing decision. Understand your rights, responsibilities and the implications of this altruistic act.

  1. Potential donor researching how to donate

    Potential donors: information and advice

    What is donation?: Because of donation, those who are unable to have children of their own are given the opportunity to have the family they want.

    How you can donate: In the UK, in order to donate you will need to contact a fertility clinic that is licensed by the HFEA to receive donations.

    Am I eligible?: You will need to fulfil certain criteria to establish your suitability to become a sperm, egg or embryo donor. Find out if you are a suitable candidate.

  2. A woman considering donation

    Existing donors

    Your legal responsibilities: If you donate through an HFEA-licensed clinic, you will not be legally responsible for any child born as a result of your donation.

    What can my donor-conceived offspring find out about me?: As a donor, you are required to complete an information form when you donate sperm, eggs or embryos for use in others’ fertility treatment. Find out what the information is used for and who can access this information.

    Resources for donors - advice & support: Your decision to donate sperm, eggs or embryos is an important one with life-long implications. There are a number of organisations that can provide further information about the issues involved.

  3. Donor researching her legal rights and responsibilities

    Apply for information and re-register

    Re-register as an identifiable donor: The rules around donor identifying information – who can access it, and what the current laws on donor identification are.

    Applying for information: Donors are entitled to request information from the HFEA about the number, sex and year of birth of any people born as a result of their donation.

Re-register as an identifiable donor

Man reading about IVF, donation and fertility clinicsIf you donated before 1 April 2005 you are automatically anonymous.

If you donated after 1 April 2005, by law, you are identifiable. Those born as a result of donation after this time are entitled to request and receive their donor’s name and last known address, once they reach the age of 18.

...more about donor anonymity

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